Definitions/Concepts

 

Home Up Origins of Morality? KWL
 

 

The Moral Guideline
 

" DO the MOST LOVING, LEAST HARMFUL thing
for EVERYONE in the
SITUATION."

 

 

 

 

Directions: The following FOUNDATIONAL CONCEPTS are the tools we will use all year as we morally evaluate social issues, situations, and our own actions.

 

 

FOUNDATIONAL CONCEPTS

of Catholic Christian Moral Teaching

 

1. Future Shock:  A philosophy of change written by Alvin Toffler in 1972 that asserts that change has changed: since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, and especially since 1900,  the rate of change has changed: it has sped up.  Technological, social and cultural changes have been happening so fast that they are ahead of societies’ capacity to make decisions about whether or not these changes are moral i.e. good for individuals and society.

For more information see: http://www.seniorreligion.com/future_shock.htm

 

 

 

2. Definitions of Morality:

Moral:  a decision or action that is good or right:  nobody or nothing gets hurt.

Immoral: a decision or action that is bad or wrong: somebody or something gets hurt.

Amoral: a decision or action that is morally neutral : nobody or nothing could get hurt.

 

 

3. Dimensions of Morality:  Every moral decision has both of the following dimensions:

PERSONAL: the individual has the moral responsibility to decide or act.

SOCIETAL: societal institutions have the moral responsibility to decide or act.

 

4. Objective and Subjective Morality:

 

OBJECTIVE (left brained/thinker) : an objective moral decision is made on the basis of rules, laws and principles which are drawn

from core human values and universal moral principles which exist in every time, culture and religion: i.e. don’t: kill, steal, lie, commit adultery…etc.  Individuals who are extremely objective can be perceived as rigid and cruel.  Societies which typify this approach to morality can also be very dangerous i.e. theocracies like the Taliban in Afghanistan and Nigeria.

 

SUBJECTIVE (right brained/feeler) a subjective moral decision is made on the basis of the person, their feelings, the other people involved,

and  the situation.  This is a relativistic approach where everything “depends”…there is no external moral standard.  Individuals who

are are extremely subjective can be perceived as immoral, selfish rationalizers who do whatever they want to do. A society that

typifies this approach is America.  Our value for freedom and individualism has crossed over the line into license and a

self-centered,materialistic attitude towards life. 

 

 

5. THE”     Moral Guideline : THAT WE WILL USE ALL YEAR TO RESOLVE MORAL DILEMMAS...

 

1.      Derives from Jesus’ balancing of the objective (Jewish Law) and the subjective (a Person Centered Morality) as seen in the

      Gospel story of the woman caught in adultery: he supported both the law and the person.

 

2.      The Catholic moral tradition has encapsulated this approach into the following:

 

“ DO THE MOST LOVING, LEAST HARMFUL THING FOR EVERYONE IN THE  SITUATION .”

 

MOST LOVING, LEAST HARMFUL is OBJECTIVE:

it takes you outside of the immediate situation and requires you to think about universal moral principles.

 

EVERYONE,  SITUATION: SUBJECTIVE:

values the people involved, and recognizes that the ideal cannot be achieved in every situation.

 

6. Values:

Are what we prize, prefer, and think are important.  They are our priorities, because they are what we actually choose and do.

 What you spend your money on shows what you value because you have to make a choice.

 

 

 7. When Values are in Conflict:

 

  • When you have to choose between a positive value and a negative value, the decision is easier to make because you at

           least you know what the moral choice is.

  • Choosing between 2 negative values is more difficult because no matter what you do, someone is going to get hurt: 

           ‘the lesser of two evils”.

  • Choosing between 2 positive values is also more difficult because you have to determine which good thing is the most

           important to you.

 

 
8. Gospel Values: are what Jesus said, what Jesus did, and what Jesus told us to do.
The Core Gospel Values are:
  • Respect for the Life and Dignity of Each Person               

  • Equality

  • Love                                                                                    

  • Honesty

  • Mercy                                                                                  

  • Poverty

  • Compassion                                                                        

  • Simplicity

  • Forgiveness                                                                        

  • Community

  • Justice                                                                                  

  • Trust

  • Peace

 

9. SOCIETAL VALUES are usually the OPPOSITE of Gospel Values.  This is why the Kingdom of God that Jesus announced

was already among us is referred to as  The Upside Down Kingdom.

 

10. The Social Teaching of the Church: is derived from Gospel Values and has developed primarily in the past 100 years. 
 It has been called  “ THE BEST KEPT SECRET IN THE CATHOLIC CHURCH “.  The main points are outlined below, but
please  refer to your handout for the full explanation.

 

 
The 7 Major Themes of Catholic Social Teaching:

Go To: http://www.lovingjustwise.com/themes_of_cst.htm

1.       Life and Dignity of the Human Person

2.     Call to Family, Community and Participation

3.     Rights and responsibilities

4.     Option for the Poor and Vulnerable

5.     The Dignity of Work and the Rights of Workers

6.     Solidarity

7.     Care for God’s Creation

 

11. HOW TO ASSESS THE VALUES/PRIORITIES OF A CULTURE:

1. Who/what is seen as 'successful'?

2. What is the most money spent on?

3. What are the largest and tallest buildings?

 

12. Media Analysis:

1. What does it say?

2. How does it affect the individual?

3. How does it affect the society/culture?